Posts from 2012

    • The fiscal cliff that is always there
    • The fiscal cliff that is always there

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      In the aftermath of Sandy and the midst of the looming fiscal cliff, many struggle to resolve immediate civil legal issues. For low-income New Yorkers who live in constant danger of their own, personal fiscal cliff, these challenges are nothing new.

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    • Recommended Reading
    • Recommended Reading

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      I recently had the pleasure of attending the 2012 conference of the National Cancer Legal Services Network, held just a few weeks after Storm Sandy hit New York. This terrific event was organized by Randye Retkin, director of NYLAG’s LegalHealth Unit and attended – despite the storm – by professionals from over 50 organizations from around […]

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    • The growing problem of mold
    • The growing problem of mold

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      Earlier this week the Gotham Gazette reported on the growing problem of mold in homes flooded by Sandy. Click here to read the article. NYLAG has been seeing the problem first hand. For example, we are working with a 28-year-old single mother of three who lives in Staten Island. She is recovering from cancer and […]

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    • One-stop Sandy aid centers a great step for NYC
    • One-stop Sandy aid centers a great step for NYC

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      Earlier this week Mayor Bloomberg announced the launch of NYC Restore, a citywide initiative opening Restoration Centers in neighborhoods ravaged by Sandy to connect residents and businesses with information and referrals to available City services and the many local community-based organizations lined up to help.

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    • There are better ways to honor Holocaust survivors
    • There are better ways to honor Holocaust survivors

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      “Proudly Bearing Elders’ Scars, Their Skin Says ‘Never Forget’,” published on October 2 in The New York Times, reports on young Israelis who have had their relatives’ Auschwitz numbers tattooed, as a deeply personal way to honor survivors. As president of an organization that has served over 60,000 Holocaust survivors since 1999, it would be […]

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