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NYLAG responds to public charge rule change

For Immediate Release  

Contact: bpacheco@nylag.org | c: 917.771.9845

(NEW YORK, NY) August 12, 2019: Today, the Trump Administration has made a change to the public charge rule, effectively making it more difficult for certain immigrants with low-income to secure permanent residency or temporary visas. The final and enforceable version of the rule is slated to go into effect in October. The New York Legal Assistance Group’s (NYLAG) Managing Attorney Lisa Rivera has issued the following statement:

“In another thinly veiled tactic to unfairly target immigrant communities, the change to the public charge rule will make it harder for certain immigrants to obtain lawful status and will discourage people from enrolling in life-saving programs including SNAP (i.e. food stamps), Medicaid and housing assistance. 

“The chilling effect on countless immigrants—parents, providers, our elders, those with disabilities, and children—may prevent them for receiving these needed public benefits that assist in meeting basic human necessities. 

“At NYLAG, we reaffirm our commitment to immigrant communities, and will educate and advise on the individual application of this changed rule.”

About NYLAG

Founded in 1990, the New York Legal Assistance Group (NYLAG) is a leading not-for-profit legal services organization advocating for adults, children, and families that are experiencing poverty or have low-income. We address emerging and urgent needs with comprehensive, free civil legal services, direct representation, impact litigation, policy advocacy, financial counseling, a medical-legal partnership model, and community education and partnerships.

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