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[Podcast] The Next Debt Crisis That No One’s Talking About

By Kai Wright
WYNC Studios

An ambitious young immigrant needs a car and ends up with a loan he can’t afford. His lender, Credit Acceptance, specializes in subprime car loans — lending to people with poor credit at exorbitant interest rates. Reporter Anjali Kamat tells the story of one man’s journey with his Credit Acceptance loan from a used car lot to a courtroom, and traces how, a decade after subprime mortgages brought down the economy, subprime car loans remain a favorite on Wall Street.

We hear from:

– Shanna Tallarico, Consumer Debt Attorney at New York Legal Assistance Group

– Michael Barr, Dean of Gerald R Ford School of Public Policy at University of Michigan and former Assistant Secretary for Financial Institutions at the Department of Treasury

This report was produced with support from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting as part of a collaboration between APM Reports, KCUR in Kansas City, KPCC in Southern California, WABE in Atlanta and WNYC.

Originally published in WNYC Studios on October 29, 2019

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